Creative Writing Program
Department of English

University of Texas
at San Antonio



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Journal

Issue #24


now available

$12
(includes Shipping & Handling)



 

SPECIAL FEATURE:
Suspended Animation

 

Artwork:
Matthea Harvey

 

 

 

 

Poetry & Prose:
Kristin Abraham • Kismet Al-Hussaini • Steve Barbaro •
Deborah Bernhardt • Simeon Berry • Amaranth Borsuk
• Yosa Buson • Marci Calabretta • J'lyn Chapman • Ryan Collins • Stephen Danos • Jesse DeLong • Richard Deming
• Laressa Dickey • Jenny Drai • Eugene Dubnov •
Amy England • John Fry • Dan Gutstein
• Rebekah Hall • Cynthia Hogue • Valerie Hsiung •
Allison Hutchcraft • Sally Keith • L.S. Klatt
• Benjamin Landry • Meghan Lee • David McAleavey •
Kyle McCord • Joshua McKinney • Kevin McLellan
• Jennifer Moore • Frances PostMatt Reeck • Ryann Wahl •
Elisabeth Whitehead • Kathleen Winter

 

We begin this issue with Matthea Harvey's captivating photographs of miniatures suspended in ice, followed by what we think is a compelling selection of poems, short stories, translations, and book reviews. Conceptually, we like the idea of extending the frozen miniature imagery in Harvey's photographs to the frozen landscape of Frances Post's "Self-Portrait in Antarctica," and J'Lyn Chapman's "A Poetics Of Absolute Time and Space," which examines the power of W.G. Sebald's work (a writer who was also fascinated with miniatures). Of course, to some extent, every poem or story is a miniature of each individual's world vision suspended on the page. And given Suspended Animation refers to "the slowing of life processes by external means without termination," we hope each work continues to live with your reading.

Not coincidentally, the idea of suspended animation also speaks to our plans for this journal. AL&C has branched out into book publishing in the last few years, and after much deliberation, we've decided to focus our efforts in this direction. Because AL&C exists entirely on volunteer efforts, this requires shifting resources, and so we will be putting the annual journal "on ice" for a while. Back issues will continue to be available through our website, as will updates on the book press, but we will not be accepting journal submissions for the foreseeable future. We also aren't prepared to accept unsolicited book manuscripts just yet, but please stay tuned.

In the meantime, we would like to thank the readers, contributors, former editors, volunteers, and donors who have made this journal possible for the last 24 years, and we hope you will continue to lend us your support as we focus our efforts on publishing books that uphold AL&C's long tradition of promoting innovative and "difficult" writing.

Catherine Kasper and David Ray Vance
 
 
 
 
   
 

Book Imprint

Amy England's
For The Reckless Sleeper


 
now available

$22
(includes Shipping & Handling)
 

What if your dreams could be given a material life of their own? What if your recollections of them were so vivid that, more than just recounting their logic, you could transcribe them visually for your reader?

That’s precisely what poet Amy England does in this stunning text and image collection. Her collages and dioramas are constructed from fabric and paper scraps, from the debris of conscious life. In this subconscious geography, we travel through the nightmares of the political, the paranoia of the responsible, and the tragedy of the critically aware.

Often also charmingly funny, Amy England is
the most lucid of dreamers.

 
 

Amy England has a B.A. from Brandeis University, an M.A. from University of Illinois at Chicago and a Ph.D. from the University of Denver. She is the author of two books of poetry: The Flute Ship Castricum, and Victory and Her Opposites: A Guide (illustrated by Mary Olson and Karen Andrews). Both books are published by Tupelo Press. She lives in Rogers Park in Chicago and teaches in the creative writing program at the School of the Art Institute.
 
 

Cover Photo Credit:
I See France ©2011 Amy England


England, Amy. For The Reckless Sleeper
ISBN-13: 978-0-9825647-1-4 • 94 pages • 8.5 x 8.5 inches
with 77 full-color illustrations/photographs •$24.95

 
     
     
 

 

Frank Rogaczewski's
The Fate of Humanity in Verse


 
now available

$14
(includes Shipping & Handling)


Straight from the near west suburbs of Sandburgland, Frank Rogaczewski explodes the less than brave new world we’ve unfortunately arrived at. The Fate of Humanity in Verse sears through the vast gaps of capitalism and pop culture in multi-page paragraphs of pure invention. It is quite simply, to borrow two of Rogaczewski’s titles, an “Arse Poetica” for “The Day They Outsourced America.”

— Mark Nowak

There is an uncanny sense of play in Frank Rogaczewski’s poetry and a quick, speculative intelligence that holds nothing to be either sacred or uninteresting. Movies, philosophy, television, literature, literary theory, comics, and classic rock, they’re all engaged here, banked and bangled into each other like balls in a three-dimensional billiards game.

— Michael Anania


Frank Rogaczewski holds a Ph.D. in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Illinois at Chicago and teaches in the MFA Program at Roosevelt University in Chciago. He lives in Berwyn with his wife Beverly Stewart. They are at this very minute walking their dogs—Jasmine and Seamus.

Cover Photo Credit:
Teagan at Four ©2005 by Trey Downey


Rogaczewski, Frank. The Fate of Humanity in Verse
ISBN-13: 978-0982564707 • 84 pages • $14.95

 
           
           

American Letters & Commentary, Inc, is an independent not-for-profit corporation 501(c)(3).

For over twenty years AL&C has been dedicated to publishing a literary annual promoting innovative and “difficult” writing. AL&C inaugurated its book imprint in 2009. We are immensely grateful to the Oppenheimer Foundation of Houston and to both the English Department and The College of Liberal and Fine Arts at The University of Texas at San Antonio for their generous support of the journal. The views expressed in our publications, however, are not necessarily those of UTSA, its administration, its employees, or its students, nor are they necesarrily the views of AL&C’s editors, its board of directors, its volunteers, or its donors.